Pain

Around 60 per cent of people with multiple sclerosis experience pain that troubles them or interferes with their daily activities.

This pain can be caused by the disease itself — due to damage or changes to the central nervous system, bones, muscles or soft tissues — or by unrelated causes, such as injury or other illness.

Given that most multiple sclerosis pain is chronic (lasting more than three months) it is important to develop a strategy to manage it effectively.

Pain in MS

Dr Malcolm Hogg, Pain Medicine Specialist at Royal Park, Melbourne, will explain the symptoms of pain as experienced by many people living with multiple sclerosis. (Recorded August 2016)


Webinar handouts : Pain in MS

Learn more: publications

 

Seeing MS - Pain

Photographed by Garth Oriander
Inspired by Stephen Papadopoulos' invisible symptom

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I’m burnt alive every day.
- STEPHEN PAPADOPOULOS -

 

Pain

Different levels and types of pain can strike at any time and in any part of your body.

Garth Oriander

Garth Oriander has worked in Melbourne for over 20 years. He prides himself on meeting any given photographic challenge and creating an image that is emotional and memorable.

About Stephen

Stephen Papadopoulos strives to live every day with a smile on his face. This can be difficult on some as pain can cause him to feel a torturous burning sensation throughout his body.

Common symptoms

Multiple sclerosis symptoms are varied and unpredictable, depending on which part of the central nervous system is affected and to what degree.

Symptom management

There are several treatments available to ease specific symptoms and slow the progression of multiple sclerosis.


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